What Is Strategic Alignment?

Supervisory and Human Resource Management processes are company-wide. However, company strategic alignment focuses on the relationship between the supervisory and human resource management departments. According to “The Five Keys to Supervisory and Human Resource Management,” by Paul A. DiClemente and Donald J. Younger (eds), “the relationship between the supervisory and human resources departments of a company determine whether or not the company is strategically aligned with its customers, suppliers, and competitors.” This article will focus on the relationship between the supervisory and human resource management departments.

Supervisory and Human Resource Management processes vary tremendously from company to company. One company’s philosophy in human resource management may conflict with another company’s philosophy in human resource management. There are endless possibilities for these differences. However, if the companies’ philosophy in strategic alignment are inconsistent, then the company will be unable to strategically align itself with its customers, suppliers, and competitors.

A company’s success begins and ends with the goals that it sets out to achieve. In order to achieve these goals, the company must have a strong vision and strategic alignment toward those goals. Otherwise, a company may spend too much time implementing strategies that do not serve its purpose, or the company may not have the right tools to implement its plans.

The company must also develop a plan to align its goals with its resources, and its staff must have the proper knowledge, skills, and tools necessary to help the company achieve its goals. For example, if the company’s goal is to make a profit, but it has insufficient resources to implement its plans, the company’s strategy will fail. However, if the company’s goal is to reduce costs, but the resources it needs are not available, then the company will be successful. Thus, a company must develop a cost-effectiveness analysis that considers all aspects of the company’s budget and operations.

Developing a strategy alignment is not enough, however. The company must execute that strategy. A company’s ability to execute a given strategy will often determine its success or its failure. Poorly implemented strategies can waste resources and cause problems for the company, and implementing poorly designed strategies can result in poor results.

When a company has a good understanding of its resources, the company is better able to determine which strategies are worth executing and which are not. A company that understands its resources, as reflected in its balance sheet, can implement a more efficient strategy that allows it to maximize its organizational resources while spending less money. On the other hand, a company that lacks a good understanding of its organizational resources may implement strategies that make use of too many resources or are simply incompatible with the company’s organizational culture. Poorly aligned strategies can also waste resources by causing company expenses to be greater than necessary.

One of the benefits of developing company strategic alignment is that it provides a benchmark against which a company can measure its progress. If a company takes a significant step forward, even if it does not follow through on that step, the goal is measurable. Thus, even if a company takes a large step back, if it measures poorly, there is a quantifiable action that can be taken to correct course.

Many organizations have found that developing an alignment strategy results in a significant increase in company performance. This is because aligning a company’s strategies and actions yields tangible results that can be measured. Companies that practice strategic alignment also experience fewer management problems and have a more stable organizational culture. Thus, aligning a company’s activities produces both direct and indirect benefits.